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15 Career Changing Programming Book

15 CAREER CHANGING PROGRAMMING BOOKS

The 15 Best Career Changing Programming Book to Read Right Now if You Want to Distinguish Your Career

Career Changing Programming Book

If you read just one of these best Career Changing Programming Book this year you’ll be a step ahead of nearly 80% people around you.

The best thing about learning from books is that you get to know the reason behind the codes, why it is written in a particular way, how to execute particular code. A book you finish reading is not the same book it was before you read it because it has given taught you how to think as a best programmer.

It does not matter whether you are 40 or 10 years old, reading these Career Changing Programming Book will bring a fortune to you. You can be the NEXT BIG MILLIONAIRE.

Now without wasting time here is a list of best of best Career Changing Programming Book:

Career Changing Programming Book

Peter Seibel interviews 15 of the most interesting computer programmers alive today in Coders at Work, offering a companion volume to Apress’s highly acclaimed best-seller Founders at Work by Jessica Livingston. As the words “at work” suggest, Peter Seibel focuses on how his interviewees tackle the day-to-day work of programming, while revealing much more, like how they became great programmers, how they recognize programming talent in others, and what kinds of problems they find most interesting.

Hundreds of people have suggested names of programmers to interview on the Coders at Work web site: www.codersatwork.com. The complete list was 284 names. Having digested everyone’s feedback, we selected 15 folks who’ve been kind enough to agree to be interviewed. This book was Career Changing Programming Book for all of these below:

  1. Frances Allen: Pioneer in optimizing compilers, first woman to win the Turing Award (2006) and first female IBM fellow
  2. Joe Armstrong: Inventor of Erlang
  3. Joshua Bloch: Author of the Java collections framework, now at Google
  4. Bernie Cosell: One of the main software guys behind the original ARPANET IMPs and a master debugger
  5. Douglas Crockford: JSON founder, JavaScript architect at Yahoo!
  6. L. Peter Deutsch: Author of Ghostscript, implementer of Smalltalk-80 at Xerox PARC and Lisp 1.5 on PDP-1
  7. Brendan Eich: Inventor of JavaScript, CTO of the Mozilla Corporation
  8. Brad Fitzpatrick: Writer of LiveJournal, OpenID, memcached, and Perlbal
  9. Dan Ingalls: Smalltalk implementor and designer
  10. Simon Peyton Jones: Coinventor of Haskell and lead designer of Glasgow Haskell Compiler
  11. Donald Knuth: Author of The Art of Computer Programming and creator of TeX
  12. Peter Norvig: Director of Research at Google and author of the standard text on AI
  13. Guy Steele: Coinventor of Scheme and part of the Common Lisp Gang of Five, currently working on Fortress
  14. Ken Thompson: Inventor of UNIX
  15. Jamie Zawinski: Author of XEmacs and early Netscape/Mozilla hacker

TIPS: Skip the Kindle edition and opt for the print copy since chapters are easier to reference.

Few Career Changing Programming Book on software project management have been as influential and timeless as The Mythical Man-Month. With a blend of software engineering facts and thought-provoking opinions, Fred Brooks offers insight for anyone managing complex projects. These essays draw from his experience as project manager for the IBM System/360 computer family and then for OS/360, its massive software system. Now, 20 years after the initial publication of his book, Brooks has revisited his original ideas and added new thoughts and advice, both for readers already familiar with his work and for readers discovering it for the first time.

Since Don’t Make Me Think was first published in 2000, hundreds of thousands of Web designers and developers have relied on usability guru Steve Krug’s guide to help them understand the principles of intuitive navigation and information design. Witty, commonsensical, and eminently practical, it’s one of the best-loved and most recommended books on the subject.

Now Steve returns with fresh perspective to reexamine the principles that made Don’t Make Me Think a classic–with updated examples and a new chapter on mobile usability. And it’s still short, profusely illustrated…and best of all–fun to read.

If you’ve read it before, you’ll rediscover what made Don’t Make Me Think so essential to Web designers and developers around the world. If you’ve never read it, you’ll see why so many people have said it should be required reading for anyone working on Web sites.

“After reading it over a couple of hours and putting its ideas to work for the past five years, I can say it has done more to improve my abilities as a Web designer than any other book.”
Jeffrey Zeldman, author of Designing with Web Standards

Ward Cunningham Straight from the programming trenches, The Pragmatic Programmer cuts through the increasing specialization and technicalities of modern software development to examine the core process–taking a requirement and producing working, maintainable code that delights its users. It covers topics ranging from personal responsibility and career development to architectural techniques for keeping your code flexible and easy to adapt and reuse. Read this book, and youll learn how to *Fight software rot; *Avoid the trap of duplicating knowledge; *Write flexible, dynamic, and adaptable code; *Avoid programming by coincidence; *Bullet-proof your code with contracts, assertions, and exceptions; *Capture real requirements; *Test ruthlessly and effectively; *Delight your users; *Build teams of pragmatic programmers; and *Make your developments more precise with automation. Written as a series of self-contained sections and filled with entertaining anecdotes, thoughtful examples, and interesting analogies, The Pragmatic Programmer illustrates the best practices and major pitfalls of many different aspects of software development. Whether youre a new coder, an experienced programme.

Clean Code is divided into three parts. The first describes the principles, patterns, and practices of writing clean code. The second part consists of several case studies of increasing complexity. Each case study is an exercise in cleaning up code—of transforming a code base that has some problems into one that is sound and efficient. The third part is the payoff: a single chapter containing a list of heuristics and “smells” gathered while creating the case studies. The result is a knowledge base that describes the way we think when we write, read, and clean code.

Readers will come away from this book understanding

  1. How to tell the difference between good and bad code
  2. How to write good code and how to transform bad code into good code
  3. How to create good names, good functions, good objects, and good classes
  4. How to format code for maximum readability
  5. How to implement complete error handling without obscuring code logic
  6. How to unit test and practice test-driven development

Jon Bentley’s collection of programming pearls is commonly included among the classics. Just as natural pearls grow from grains of sand that irritate oysters, programming pearls have grown from real problems that have irritated real programmers. With origins beyond solid engineering, in the realm of insight and creativity, Bentley’s pearls offer unique and clever solutions to those nagging problems. Illustrated by programs designed as much for fun as for instruction, the book is filled with lucid and witty descriptions of practical programming techniques and fundamental design principles. It is not at all surprising that Programming Pearls has been so highly valued by programmers at every level of experience. In this revision, the first in 14 years, Bentley has substantially updated his essays to reflect.

The full list of topics inside this Career Changing Programming Book:
The Interview Process

This section offers an overview on questions are selected and how you will be evaluated. What happens when you get a question wrong? When should you start preparing, and how? What language should you use? All these questions and more are answered.
Behind the Scenes
Learn what happens behind the scenes during your interview, how decisions really get made, who you interview with, and what they ask you. Companies covered include Google, Amazon, Yahoo, Microsoft, Apple and Facebook.

Special Situations

This section explains the process for experience candidates, Program Managers, Dev Managers, Testers / SDETs, and more. Learn what your interviewers are looking for and how much code you need to know.

Before the Interview

In order to ace the interview, you first need to get an interview. This section describes what a software engineer’s resume should look like and what you should be doing well before your interview.
 Behavioral Preparation
Although most of a software engineering interview will be technical, behavioral questions matter too. This section covers how to prepare for behavioral questions and how to give strong, structured responses.
Technical Questions (+ 5 Algorithm Approaches)
This section covers how to prepare for technical questions (without wasting your time) and teaches actionable ways to solve the trickiest algorithm problems. It also teaches you what exactly “good coding” is when it comes to an
interview.
150 Programming Questions and Answers
This section forms the bulk of the book. Each section opens with a discussion of the core knowledge and strategies to tackle this type of question, diving into exactly how you break down and solve it. Topics covered include inside this Career Changing Programming Book:
  1. Arrays and Strings
  2. Linked Lists
  3. Stacks and Queues
  4. Trees and Graphs
  5. Bit Manipulation
  6. Brain Teasers
  7. Mathematics and Probability
  8. Object-Oriented Design
  9. Recursion and Dynamic Programming
  10. Sorting and Searching
  11. Scalability and Memory Limits
  12. Testing
  13. C and C++
  14. Java
  15. Databases
  16. Threads and Locks

 

Soft Skills: The software developer’s life manual is a guide to a well-rounded, satisfying life as a technology professional. In it, developer and life coach John Sonmez offers advice to developers on important “soft” subjects like career and productivity, personal finance and investing, and even fitness and relationships. Arranged as a collection of 71 short chapters, this fun-to-read book invites you to dip in wherever you like. A Taking Action section at the end of each chapter shows you how to get quick results. Soft Skills will help make you a better programmer, a more valuable employee, and a happier, healthier person.

What’s Inside

  1. Boost your career by building a personal brand
  2. John’s secret ten-step process for learning quickly
  3. Fitness advice to turn your geekiness to your advantage
  4. Unique strategies for investment and early retirement

A Career Changing Programming Book about programming, improving skill, and avoiding mistakes.

The author spent two years researching every bug avoidance technique she could find. This Career Changing Programming Book contains the best of them.

If you want to program faster, with fewer bugs, and write more secure code, buy this book!

You’ll learn to code in Python and make your own neural network, teaching it to recognise human handwritten numbers, and performing as well as professionally developed networks.

Career Changing Programming Book Part 1 is about ideas. We introduce the mathematical ideas underlying the neural networks, gently with lots of illustrations and examples.

Career Changing Programming Book Part 2 is practical. We introduce the popular and easy to learn Python programming language, and gradually builds up a neural network which can learn to recognise human handwritten numbers, easily getting it to perform as well as networks made by professionals.

Career Changing Programming Book Part 3 extends these ideas further. We push the performance of our neural network to an industry leading 98% using only simple ideas and code, test the network on your own handwriting, take a privileged peek inside the mysterious mind of a neural network, and even get it all working on a Raspberry Pi.

All the code in this has been tested to work on a Raspberry Pi Zero.

The first edition became a widely used text in universities worldwide as well as the standard reference for professionals. The second edition featured new chapters on the role of algorithms, probabilistic analysis and randomized algorithms, and linear programming. The third edition has been revised and updated throughout. It includes two completely new chapters, on van Emde Boas trees and multithreaded algorithms, substantial additions to the chapter on recurrence (now called “Divide-and-Conquer”), and an appendix on matrices. It features improved treatment of dynamic programming and greedy algorithms and a new notion of edge-based flow in the material on flow networks. Many new exercises and problems have been added for this edition. As of the third edition, this textbook is published exclusively by the MIT Press.

Python Crash Course is a fast-paced, through introduction to programming with Python that will have you writing programs, solving problems, and making things that work in no time.

As you work through Python Crash Course, you’ll learn how to:

  1. Use powerful Python libraries and tools, including matplotlib, NumPy, and Pygal
  2. Make 2D games that respond to keypresses and mouse clicks, and that grow more difficult as the game progresses
  3. Work with data to generate interactive visualizations
  4. Create and customize simple web apps and deploy them safely online
  5. Deal with mistakes and errors so you can solve your own programming problems

Widely considered one of the best Career Changing Programming Book, Steve McConnell’s original CODE COMPLETE has been helping developers write better software for more than a decade. Now this classic book has been fully updated and revised with leading-edge practices—and hundreds of new code samples—illustrating the art and science of software construction. Capturing the body of knowledge available from research, academia, and everyday commercial practice, McConnell synthesizes the most effective techniques and must-know principles into clear, pragmatic guidance. No matter what your experience level, development environment, or project size, this book will inform and stimulate your thinking—and help you build the highest quality code.
Discover the timeless techniques and strategies that help you:

  1. Design for minimum complexity and maximum creativity
  2. Reap the benefits of collaborative development
  3. Apply defensive programming techniques to reduce and flush out errors
  4. Exploit opportunities to refactor—or evolve—code, and do it safely
  5. Use construction practices that are right-weight for your project
  6. Debug problems quickly and effectively
  7. Resolve critical construction issues early and correctly
  8. Build quality into the beginning, middle, and end of your project

Hans Camenzind, inventor of the 555 timer (the world’s most successful integrated circuit), and author of Much Ado About Almost Nothing: Man’s Encounter with the Electron (Booklocker.com)

“A fabulous Career Changing Programming Book: well written, well paced, fun, and informative. I also love the sense of humor. It’s very good at disarming the fear. And it’s gorgeous. I’ll be recommending this book highly.”

–Tom Igoe, author of Physical Computing and Making Things Talk

A “magnificent and rewarding book. … Every step of this structured instruction is expertly illustrated with photos and crisp diagrams. . . . This really is the best way to learn.”

–Kevin Kelly, in Cool Tools

The first edition of Make: Electronics established a new benchmark for introductory texts. This second edition enhances that learning experience.

BELOW BOOK SET BEST Career Changing Programming Book AS PER BILL GATES

The bible of all fundamental algorithms and the work that taught many of today’s software developers most of what they know about computer programming.

—Byte, September 1995

Countless readers have spoken about the profound personal influence of Knuth’s work. Scientists have marveled at the beauty and elegance of his analysis, while ordinary programmers have successfully applied his “cookbook” solutions to their day-to-day problems. All have admired Knuth for the breadth, clarity, accuracy, and good humor found in his books.

I can’t begin to tell you how many pleasurable hours of study and recreation they have afforded me! I have pored over them in cars, restaurants, at work, at home… and even at a Little League game when my son wasn’t in the line-up.

Charles Long

Primarily written as a reference, some people have nevertheless found it possible and interesting to read each volume from beginning to end. A programmer in China even compared the experience to reading a poem.

If you think you’re a really good programmer… read [Knuth’s] Art of Computer Programming… You should definitely send me a résumé if you can read the whole thing.

Bill Gates

Whatever your background, if you need to do any serious computer programming, you will find your own good reason to make each volume in this series a readily accessible part of your scholarly or professional library.

It’s always a pleasure when a problem is hard enough that you have to get the Knuths off the shelf. I find that merely opening one has a very useful terrorizing effect on computers.

Jonathan Laventhol